short: stories that are 00:00–10:00

A daughter learns the truth about her mother’s pregnancy.

Erin Barker
The Moth
09 min 57 sec
Air Date: 02/09/2012

Three-year-old Mason on his new car.

Jay Allison
Cowbird
0 min 57 sec
Air Date: 2012

Studs Terkel, the late oral historian, questions what has happened to “vox humana.”

Michael Garofalo
StoryCorps
1 min 47 sec
Air Date: 2005

There’s a restaurant in Albuquerque called Tim’s Place. It’s named after Tim Harris, a young man with Down syndrome who started the business with help from his dad.

Jasmyn Belcher
StoryCorps
03 min 13 sec
Air Date: 03/15/2013

A hundred years ago, when a child wrote a note to Santa Claus, it wound up in the “dead letters” room at the post office, never to be delivered. That changed in 1913, because of an enterprising New Yorker named John Gluck.

Jim O'Grady
WNYC
08 min 56 sec
Air Date: 12/24/2012

It was the summer of 1966 when a persistent 17-year-old with a high school radio show near Chicago got the interview of a lifetime. But only a handful of people ever got to hear the conversation, in which Ali epically riffs about fighting on Mars.

Michael Aisner
Blank On Blank
07 min 20 sec
Air Date: 1966

When she was a young girl, Rebecca Johnson and her mother took a trip to a department store in Boston, where Rebecca found a book that she begged her mother to buy. What happened next stays with her to this day, 38 years later.

Nate Goldman
WBUR
02 min 09 sec
Air Date: 07/10/2012

Alice Waters and the Kitchen Sisters pay tribute to an American cooking legend. Marion Cunningham drove a fast Jag and swam daily into her 80s. She was funny and wise and everyone in the food world sought her advice and opinion.

The Kitchen Sisters
07 min 21 sec
Air Date: 07/12/2012

Falcon Lake, right on the Texas-Mexico border, is ranked the best lake in America for bass fishing. But Mexico’s Zeta cartel also likes to use the lake — to smuggle drugs.

Wade Goodwyn
All Things Considered
08 min 19 sec
Air Date: 06/26/2012

If you traveled Florida’s Route 1 in the 1960s, you might have encountered a young, African-American artist, selling a lushly painted oil landscape from his car. They weren’t allowed in galleries — but motels, office buildings and tourists would buy their works.

Jacki Lyden
NPR
07 min 46 sec
Air Date: 07/04/2012

Ira Glass and his friend Etgar Keret were at the Cindy Sherman show at MoMA when a woman came up to them claiming to be Cindy Sherman. Then she said she wasn’t. Later, against Etgar’s wishes, Ira calls Cindy to clear things up.

Ira Glass
This American Life
9 min 00 sec
Air Date: 06/29/2012

Motherhood in war-torn South Africa brings heartache and healing to one family.

Anna Sussman
Snap Judgment
09 min 10 sec
Air Date: 06/08/2012

Brooke Gladstone tells how her love of science fiction began with the sci-fi author.

Brooke Gladstone
On The Media
06 min 27 sec
Air Date: 06/08/2012

Jake Warga chronicles the life and decline of his paternal grandmother. As she grew older, she mistook Warga for his father, who had already died.

Jake Warga
All Things Considered
08 min 14 sec
Air Date: 10/06/2005

Playing around with audio samples taken from pornography films, producer Ed Prosser was struck by how much the moans and groans came to resemble the calls of whales.

Ed Prosser
On The Nature Of Things
02 min 16 sec
Air Date: 05/16/2012

The effects of bullying, discussed by an often ignored expert: a young bully himself.

Jones Franzel
Transom
09 min 33 sec
Air Date: 03/13/2012

Jaimita Haskell got bumped up into a more advanced high school program, where all the books were brand new and the students listened politely to each other. So she wasn’t pleased when she got dropped back into the chaos of mainstream classes.

Czerina Patel
Marianne McCune
Radio Rookies
08 min 47 sec
Air Date: 04/16/2002

The indie rock star Thao Nguyen tells a true story about her sweet, lovely grandma — who you definitely do not want to mess with.

Stephanie Foo
Snap Judgment
07 min 07 sec
Air Date: 04/19/2012

In 1941, two warships from Australia and Germany clashed off the coast of western Australia. Both sank. Despite extensive search efforts, the ships weren’t found until 2008, when psychologists analyzed statements given by surviving crew members.

Alix Spiegel
Morning Edition
08 min 56 sec
Air Date: 09/27/2011

A story about what happens when natural enemies meet — in an Alcoholics Anonymous program in prison. From David Sedaris’ collection of animal fables.

David Sedaris
This American Life
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 02/24/2006

Three years ago, Ceil Muller’s husband died unexpectedly. In a sound essay, she offers some tips for those who find themselves in such a situation.

Ceil Muller
All Things Considered
07 min 45 sec
Air Date: 08/23/2003

Three years ago, Ceil Muller’s husband died unexpectedly. In a sound essay, she offers some tips for those who find themselves in such a situation.

Ceil Muller
All Things Considered
07 min 45 sec
Air Date: 08/23/2003

The. This. Though. I. And. An. There. That. Psychologist James Pennebaker explains how the words we think about the least can reveal the most about our relationships.

Alix Spiegel
Morning Edition
08 min 29 sec
Air Date: 04/30/2012

When Josh Healey enters into a new relationship, he’s got explaining to do at home.

Josh Healey
Snap Judgment
07 min 02 sec
Air Date: 12/30/2011

A woman reveals to her boyfriend that she’s not always what she seems.

Etgar Keret
This American Life
06 min 00 sec
Air Date: 04/02/2010

L. Abdul Kenyatta courts the love of his life and explains the roots of hip-hop to his son.

Jamie DeWolf
Snap Judgment
04 min 20 sec
Air Date: 02/28/2012

For the veterans of the Civil War, memories and remembrances were different than for veterans of later wars. Without images or sounds, shared experience was the only evidence that what the veterans remember actually took place.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
05 min 50 sec
Air Date: 11/08/2011

A story about being a crybaby, from David Sedaris’ book of animal fables.

David Sedaris
This American Life
06 min 00 sec
Air Date: 09/24/2010

At the countdown to the New Year, Joe Frank is feeling the weight of time.

Joe Frank
Hearing Voices
02 min 36 sec
Air Date: 01/01/2005

Les and Scott GrantSmith’s marriage was on the rocks. They had been together 10 years and had two children, but Les was hiding the fact that she felt trapped in her body.

Michael Garofalo
StoryCorps
04 min 11 sec
Air Date: 03/09/2012

Tod Machover is recognized as one of the most innovative composers of his generation. He has astounded the world with his avant-garde musical explorations, including an opera staged with robots. He’s also an inventor, changing the way people make music.

Bianca Vazquez Toness
WBUR
08 min 37 sec
Air Date: 04/10/2012

Edward R. Murrow reporting from London for American audiences in 1940.

Edward R. Murrow
CBS
01 min 39 sec
Air Date: 1940

Sarah Vowell tells the story of the Marquis de Lafayette’s triumphant return to America after becoming really, really unpopular in his native France.

Sarah Vowell
This American Life
7 min 00 sec
Air Date: 07/01/2005

In 1946, legendary radio dramatist Norman Corwin was named the first recipient of the “One World Flight” Award. His prize was a four month trip around the world. Corwin used his global journey to produce a series of thirteen radio documentaries for CBS.

Mary Beth Kirchner
Lost & Found Sound
08/13/1999 min sec
Air Date:

David Plant has skin cancer that has begun to metastasize to other parts of his body. So, just before his 81st birthday, he sat down with his stepson to talk about their life.

Katie Simon
StoryCorps
03 min 09 sec
Air Date: 03/30/2012

The tragic inspiration behind the invention of Morse code.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
03 min 52 sec
Air Date: 2012

Provincetown hairdresser Dougie Freeman on a recent acquisition at his shop. From WCAI’s collection of pioneering, regional station identifications.

Jay Allison
WCAI
01 min 01 sec
Air Date: 2011

Presidents have been getting code names back to Harry Truman, also known as General. And their family gets them, too. Nancy Reagan? Code name: Rainbow.

Ian Chillag
Mike Danforth
How To Do Everything
03 min 01 sec
Air Date: 03/24/2012

Forest Park is the last stop on Chicago’s blue line. Famous for its graveyards, one in particular catches your attention: Showmen’s Rest, a burial place for circus performers.

Shannon Heffernan
PRX
05 min 13 sec
Air Date: 10/31/2007

Fashion Week emerged almost accidentally in New York during World War II.

Sara Fishko
Fishko Files
08 min 03 sec
Air Date: 02/12/2010

Artists often wonder if the distractions of the modern world compromise their creativity. Andrew Bird put the theory to the test. “Let’s see what happens when I stop listening to records, move out in the middle of nowhere, and have the space to experiment.”

Jonathan Menjivar
Studio 360
07 min 21 sec
Air Date: 10/28/2005

Hidden away in a castle-like mound on the African savannah lives the termite queen. There, in an impenetrable earthen capsule, she lays a quarter of a billion children.

The Kitchen Sisters
The Hidden World Of Girls
06 min 31 sec
Air Date: 05/06/2011

Billy McCune is one of the most important subjects in the history of documentary photography. In 1950, he was sentenced to die in the electric chair, but a song he wrote on death row caught the ear of the governor, who commuted his sentence.

Matt Ozug
Sound Portraits
07 min 57 sec
Air Date: 10/06/2007

John Hodgman tells a story about returning to the beach after a very bad year.

John Hodgman
This American Life
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 07/25/2003

Author and Harvard literature professor Stephen Greenblatt explores the 2,000 year-old writings of Lucretius and his “spookily modern” creation tale.

Robert Krulwich
Hmmm...
07 min 34 sec
Air Date: 09/19/2011

“I felt like I was looking at kind of a new form of comedy,” Steve Martin says of Twitter. “In a strange way, that was talking and response and talking and response.”

Renee Montagne
Morning Edition
07 min 19 sec
Air Date: 03/15/2012

Glynn lives in the shadow of his caramel-colored cousin. But he’s fighting back.

Glynn Washington
Snap Judgment
06 min 23 sec
Air Date: 03/09/2012

“I think that’s one of the beautiful things about Gram Parsons,” says Polly Parsons. “He’s one of the rare artists you can hear his spirit and his sadness in his music.”

Alex Ashlock
Here & Now
09 min 24 sec
Air Date: 03/14/2012

In the US, it’s called a line. In Canada, it’s often referred to as a line-up. Pretty much everywhere else, it’s known as a queue. Benjamen Walker’s preoccupation with the subject led him to find a man known as “Dr. Queue,” a queue theorist at MIT.

Benjamen Walker
Roman Mars
99% Invisible
09 min 54 sec
Air Date: 03/08/2012

When an author writes something that’s supposed to be true and readers discover it’s not, things can get ugly fast. But author John D’Agata and his former fact-checker Jim Fingal take the controversial position of defending an author’s right to embellish.

Travis Larchuk
Morning Edition
07 min 23 sec
Air Date: 03/08/2012

A sit down with a man accused of some of the most horrific acts imaginable, as a warlord with The Lord’s Resistance Army in Northern Uganda.

Anna Sussman
Snap Judgment
06 min 36 sec
Air Date: 08/27/2011

The photographer Michele Iversen documents strangers in their own homes, without permission. At night she sits in her car, looking in and waiting for the perfect shot.

Jonathan Mitchell
Studio 360
06 min 24 sec
Air Date: 10/07/2011

In 1906, the Bronx Zoo in New York unveiled a new exhibit that would attract thousands of visitors. Inside a cage, in the monkey house, was a man.

Joe Richman
Radio Diaries
08 min 19 sec
Air Date: 09/08/2006

A twist on the timeless question: Is it art?

Andy Ross
Wait For It ...
02 min 40 sec
Air Date: 03/08/2010

Victoria Claflin Woodhull was many things: a clairvoyant, a businesswoman, an advocate for women’s rights, and a magnet for media scandal. But she is best known as the first woman to run for president, in 1872. From the five-part series Contenders.

Joe Richman
Radio Diaries
08 min 10 sec
Air Date: 10/13/2008

An autotune remix of footage from TED talks, Carl Sagan documentaries, Discovery Channel programming, and other things brain. From the Symphony of Science series.

John Boswell
Symphony of Science
03 min 42 sec
Air Date: 2011

For twenty years, Robert Shields has kept a written record of absolutely everything that has happened to him. For no less than four hours each day, Shields holes himself up in a small office in his home and types – 35 million words and counting.

David Isay
Sound Portraits
06 min 53 sec
Air Date: 01/27/1994

A five-year-old girl cuts off the hair of her three-year-old sister. A few weeks later, they give their father an explanation of what happened that day.

Jeff Cohen
PRX
02 min 57 sec
Air Date: 02/07/2012

An exploration of the Gershwin tune, and its many interpretations.

Sara Fishko
Fishko Files
07 min 30 sec
Air Date: 06/17/2011

Since the “shot heard round the world” on April 19, 1775, the dates of April 19 and April 20 have been imbued with significance. From Hitler’s birth to the killings at Waco, Columbine, and Oklahoma City, each event echoes or evokes the anniversary of the last.

Bob Garfield
Brooke Gladstone
On The Media
03 min 53 sec
Air Date: 04/16/2010

The tradition of siblings singing together is as old as song.

Sara Fishko
Fishko Files
08 min 47 sec
Air Date: 12/16/2011

Joseph Guillotin and Henry Shrapnel became immortal by entering the English language. But when your life is reduced to a single definition, the results can be upsetting.

Robert Krulwich
Hmmm...
04 min 35 sec
Air Date: 09/28/2011

The story of sisters who, at the ripe old ages of 11 and 14, concocted a prank that put them at the center of the spiritualism movement in 19th century America.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
09 min 41 sec
Air Date: 03/12/2010

The sounds of the city, through the music, noise, and voices of some of its eight million people. In this chapter of The London Chronicles, an audio journey through “fear.”

Francesca Panetta
BBC
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 2012

A soundscape of weather, walks, and slugs in North Wales.

Ed Prosser
On The Nature Of Things
03 min 03 sec
Air Date: 03/13/2012

A Hollywood sound designer demonstrates how it can enhance emotional impact.

Jonathan Mitchell
Studio 360
06 min 00 sec
Air Date: 2002

A world in which meteorologists have vanished suddenly and without explanation, and people begin to study details of the weather themselves. The first story in a trilogy.

Thomasin Sleigh
Paper Radio
04 min 24 sec
Air Date: 10/30/2010

Fifty years ago, in television’s simpler days, all three networks aired a tour of the White House led by the First Lady. A stunning number of Americans tuned in.

Sara Fishko
Fishko Files
08 min 08 sec
Air Date: 02/10/2012

After years of ignoring the wailing and screeching of the escalators in the DC Metro, Washington Post music critic Chris Richards began to hear them in a new way.

Sam Greenspan
99% Invisible
07 min 20 sec
Air Date: 12/20/2011

There’s a famous William Carlos Williams poem. It’s only three lines long, you’ve probably read it, the one about eating the plums in the icebox. It’s possibly the most spoofed poem around. Some regular This American Life contributors get into the act.

Sean Cole
This American Life
07 min 00 sec
Air Date: 04/18/2008

Don Henry Ford, a convicted drug smuggler, made millions smuggling marijuana across the Texas border in the 1970s and 80s, even after nearly all his fellow criminals were either dead or in prison. The first story in a three-part profile of Ford.

Scott Carrier
Day To Day
07 min 47 sec
Air Date: 05/18/2005

“In the afterlife, you relive all your experiences, but this time with the events reshuffled into a new order. All the moments that share a quality are grouped together.”

David Eagleman
The Guardian
3 min 11 sec
Air Date: 04/04/2010

Jack DeJohnette is a drum legend. But he started out on the piano. Inspired by Fats Domino, he’d begun a promising career when he heard Ahmad Jamal’s 1958 album. He was entranced by the drummer, who had a particular way of handling brushes.

Michael Raphael
Studio 360
05 min 42 sec
Air Date: 02/03/2012

Even a building is a living thing. It breathes and it moves, and this movement makes a sound. Les Robertson, the structural engineer of the World Trade Center, says that the people working inside the tower couldn’t feel this movement, but they could hear it.

A complicated answer to a seemingly simple question changes a family’s geometry.

Stephanie Foo
Snap Judgment
05 min 59 sec
Air Date: 01/20/2012

As an information designer, Nick Felton has tabulated thousands of tiny measurements in his life and depicted them in graphs that detail the activities of a particular year. In 2010, his father died and Felton turned his annual report into a full biography.

Nate Berg
Roman Mars
99% Invisible
09 min 55 sec
Air Date: 07/13/2011

Recordings of the presidential inaugurations. The first such sound recording was made in 1925 – Calvin Coolidge’s ceremony. It was one of the first electrical recordings, using not acoustical horns, but microphones and amplifiers to to capture audio.

Barrett Golding
Hearing Voices
08 min 57 sec
Air Date: 01/19/2009

Most people have one. But why do they choose the numbers they do?

Robert Krulwich
Hmmm...
05 min 15 sec
Air Date: 08/21/2011

Dan Smith and his kitchen sink that sounds like jazz. From WCAI’s collection of pioneering, regional station identifications.

Sarah Reynolds
WCAI
1 min 00 sec
Air Date: 2009

When Jack Hitt was 11, he did the worst thing his Baptist father could have imagined. Neither Jack nor his four siblings will ever forget the punishment.

Jack Hitt
This American Life
06 min 00 sec
Air Date: 05/04/2007

The incredible story of Ellen and William Craft’s escape from slavery in 1848. This one has it all: cross-dressing, guns, romance, and a riveting end.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
05 min 57 sec
Air Date: 07/06/2009

A song so sad that George Jones was initially reluctant to record it. Yet it became one of the most popular songs in country music.

Ben Manilla
Devon Strolovitch
Studio 360
06 min 05 sec
Air Date: 12/24/2009

Pondering the mysteries of the popular song.

Sara Fishko
Fishko Files
08 min 00 sec
Air Date: 11/22/2006

When Shirley Chisholm launched her spirited campaign in 1972, she took on the establishment fully aware of the hopeless odds. From the five-part series Contenders.

Joe Richman
Radio Diaries
07 min 37 sec
Air Date: 10/17/2008

Joshua Klein is fascinated by crows. After a long amateur study of their behavior, he came up with a machine that may form a new bond between animal and human.

Joshua Klein
TED Talks
08 min 23 sec
Air Date: 2008

Dennis Baxter and Bill Whiston are sound designers for TV sporting events. Their job is to draw the audience in and make sports sound as exciting as possible. It sometimes means they fake it. You can download a longer version that aired on BBC Radio 4.

Peregrine Andrews
99% Invisible
05 min 29 sec
Air Date: 10/13/2011

“In case you hadn’t noticed,
it has somehow become uncool
to sound like you know what you’re talking about?
Or believe strongly in what you’re saying?”

Taylor Mali
Day To Day
03 min 15 sec
Air Date: 04/20/2005

Santa grants one last Christmas wish, then closes the case on another year.

Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre
NPR
04 min 59 sec
Air Date: 1984

David Perez is locked in a jealous tango with his sexy grad student girlfriend. They push each other’s boundaries. Until one night, it all goes too far.

Jamie DeWolf
Snap Judgment
05 min 58 sec
Air Date: 12/16/2011

The London Philharmonic Orchestra version of the game’s theme song.

NPR Music
03 min 18 sec
Air Date: 12/21/2011

The Vatican conducts a rigorous investigation into whether a boy’s recovery from a flesh-eating bacteria was more than just incredible luck. Plus, an update to the story.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty
Morning Edition
07 min 46 sec
Air Date: 04/22/2011

Without all the beeps and chimes, without sonic feedback, all of your modern conveniences would be very hard to use. Electronic things are made to feel mechanical. The sound of an iPhone turning on? Sounds a lot like a vise.

Roman Mars
99% Invisible
4 min 51 sec
Air Date: 02/11/2011

Ameena Matthews thought she’d found love and respect as a lieutenant for a drug ring. Now she’s a violence interrupter, trying to break up patterns that got her involved.

Stephanie Foo
Snap Judgment
09 min 21 sec
Air Date: 12/16/2011

Edwin Booth was a very famous actor. Then his brother shot Abraham Lincoln.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
05 min 16 sec
Air Date: 05/22/2009

From a phone conversation the comedian had with Jane Borden of Time Out magazine. The tape begins with Gervais explaining why religious views aren’t central to his routine. Blank on Blank is an audio archive of unexpected, forgotten bits of interviews.

David Gerlach
Blank On Blank
06 min 26 sec
Air Date: 2010

A dream of a super radio that would allow one to hear every sound ever made.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
03 min 17 sec
Air Date: 06/01/2009

A group of very nice ladies from Long Island, except when it comes to groceries. The coupon club waits for the best deals, then pounces, to the horror of grocery store owners with no idea what hit them. Listen to other archive Robert Krulwich stories.

Robert Krulwich
NPR
05 min 18 sec
Air Date: 1981

In 1903, Guglielmo Marconi made his historic transatlantic broadcast from Cape Cod. Imagine, on that day, there was only one message traveling in waves in the air.

Dennis Downey
Transom
04 min 27 sec
Air Date: 01/01/2003
via @prx

Lucia Betts is 6. She’s noticed some certain inconsistencies in the Santa story.

Andy Mills
03 min 37 sec
Air Date: 12/04/2010

Impart as much knowledge as you can to a resident of the 14th century — go!

Kasper Hauser
Maximum Fun
04 min 57 sec
Air Date: 10/17/2006

On the Las Vegas strip, one might begin with the slot machines on a casino floor. And if one were willing to pay admission, an elevator could transport the seeker to more vice and excess upstairs. But what if there were an elevator that went downward?

Adam Burke
Day To Day
08 min 56 sec
Air Date: 12/04/2008

Like guys shouting over the music to pick up girls at a bar, scientists say urban birds are changing their tune to hear one other above the din.

Sabri Ben-Achour
WAMU
05 min 00 sec
Air Date: 12/09/2011
via @prx

A crack addict finds Jesus, gets off drugs and rings bells at the Mall of America in Minneapolis. Oh, and he never stops singing, either.

2 below zero
Day To Day
04 min 54 sec
Air Date: 12/07/2007
via @prx

On a summer afternoon, three 10-year-old kids push around a soccer-ball-style sorbet maker and concoct stories to make their task more interesting.

Sara Curtis
PRX
04 min 59 sec
Air Date: 07/14/2011

Two sisters, now in their seventies, have preserved the same relationship they had as girls — down to the matching outfits and shared favorites.

Hillary Frank
This American Life
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 08/11/2000

For more than 60 years, people in northwest Tennessee have tuned each weekday at noon to a radio program called The Swap Shop. For 20 minutes, listeners call or write offering to buy, sell or trade in a broadcast version of the classified ads.

Dan Collison
Elizabeth Meister
Long Haul
08 min 48 sec
Air Date: 04/14/2006

Milton Reid works as a muralist in one of the largest housing projects in America. Starting at about 50 dollars, he’ll paint a resident’s wall. When he first started, all clients wanted were black and gold panthers, but their tastes have gotten more varied.

Amy Dorn
This American Life
08 min 00 sec
Air Date: 07/12/2002

Mohammed Naseehu Ali is a native of Ghana, the son of a king. Instead of tribal politics, Ali chose to leave Ghana for the United States and became a musician and writer. But he hasn’t left behind the memories of a song from his childhood.

Ann Heppermann
Kara Oehler
Weekend America
07 min 06 sec
Air Date: 05/13/2006

What began as a promotion for his new album turned into two hours of rare Beatle stories and playing DJ — introducing the music, commercials and weather.

Dennis Elsas
WNEW
05 min 55 sec
Air Date: 09/28/1974

Jim Peacock, a sailor from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, survived the attack because he was still on his way to church. “I could hear some awful explosions,” he remembers, “and here was these planes and they were dropping bombs out there.”

Curt Nickisch
SDPR
05 min 03 sec
Air Date: 2004

Master of Horror Mick Garris, a former Mexican Mafia hit man and a self-aware hypochondriac on how we’re held captive by others and ourselves.

Ben Adair
Pacific Drift
09 min 43 sec
Air Date: 06/25/2006

The frontman for Antony and the Johnsons says everything changed for him when he discovered the Japanese butoh dancer Kazuo Ohno. “I decided he was my art parent. Someone who’s footsteps I would follow in. I would trust him.”

Leital Molad
Studio 360
08 min 28 sec
Air Date: 01/14/2011

A solo project from Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor.

Chris Taylor
NPR Music
04 min 59 sec
Air Date: 12/01/2011

Fried rabbit, barbecued rabbit, rice with rabbit gravy — all standard fare at the Rabbit Hutch Restaurant in Logan, Alabama. But food was only part of the experience.

Shea Shackelford
Place + Memory
07 min 25 sec
Air Date: 07/18/2009

The people of Lubec, Maine, are met with an unpleasant surprise when an enormous whale washes onto the beachfront of their tiny coastal town. As the 60-ton creature begins to decompose, the town is forced to come up with a plan to get rid of it.

Molly Menschel
Salt Institute
08 min 27 sec
Air Date: 2004

The town of Baudette, Minnesota, sits on the US/Canadian border. It’s home to a now-decommissioned Coast Guard tower built to guide people across and around the Great Lakes. The band Mountain Man helps to tell this story of navigation gone wrong.

Dan Collison
Elizabeth Meister
Long Haul
07 min 07 sec
Air Date: 06/26/2011

Orson Welles and H.G. Wells’ are linked in the public imagination thanks to The War of The Worlds, Wells’ sci-fi novel adapted by Welles in 1938 for radio, causing panic across the US. Two years after the broadcast, the men met for a short conversation.

Charles C. Shaw
KTSA
07 min 27 sec
Air Date: 10/28/1940

Steve McGreevy goes to Canada for the Northern Lights. Not to see them, but to hear them. You can do that, with the right equipment. And Steve’s got a van full. He records Natural Radio, the sound of earth’s magnetic field.

Barrett Golding
Hearing Voices
08 min 07 sec
Air Date: 05/03/1996

The story of Elizabeth Van Lew, known as Crazy Bet. Her odd behavior — freeing her slaves, visiting Yankee POWs in prison — made tongues wag in the Confederate capital. But Richmond society couldn’t begin to guess what was really going on.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
07 min 52 sec
Air Date: 09/29/2011

Cell phones and laptops rely on a mineral called coltan and growing demand in the west has had ramifications in distant corners of the world. The Democratic Republic of Congo has about 80 percent of the world’s coltan reserves, and that has spawned a corrupt and violent industry. Hear other stories in the “Working” series.

Gregory Warner
Homelands Production
07 min 52 sec
Air Date: 11/20/2008

“I believe that singing is the key to long life, a good figure, a stable temperament, increased intelligence, new friends, super self-confidence, heightened sexual attractiveness and a better sense of humor,” Eno says.

Brian Eno
This I Believe
05 min 29 sec
Air Date: 11/23/2008

Joanna Blum gave birth to a son who weighed 2 pounds, 11 ounces. He lived about 10 minutes. Ashley Hutcheson, a photographer, was there to document his birth.

Mary Beth Kirchner
All Things Considered
07 min 23 sec
Air Date: 12/30/2009

In 1988, Deborah Luster’s mother was murdered by a contract killer. To cope, Luster turned to photography — in prisons. “The perspective was that everyone is a whole person, that they’re not just the sum of their worst acts or even their best acts.”

The Kitchen Sisters
The Hidden World Of Girls
07 min 49 sec
Air Date: 06/30/2010

Bernard, 86, has been alone since the death of his partner. He charts his life story and inner struggle in South London during a time when sex between men was illegal.

Laurence Grissell
BBC Radio 4
07 min 31 sec
Air Date: 08/23/2009

The CIA enlists a cat as a listening device in its fight against the Soviets. The plan fails.

Nate DiMeo
The Memory Palace
03 min 56 sec
Air Date: 06/24/2009

Two sleepovers occurring on the same night in Philadelphia. Hillary Frank hangs out with the girls, Jonathan Menjivar goes to the boy’s house down the street.

Hillary Frank
Jonathan Menjivar
Weekend America
07 min 45 sec
Air Date: 10/24/2009

The idea is simple: if we all shared a second, neutral language, people of all different cultures could communicate freely and easily, and it would foster international understanding and peace. This is the idea behind the invention of Esperanto.

Roman Mars
99% Invisible
05 min 53 sec
Air Date: 06/23/2011

Just after World War II ended, US soldiers smuggled the Third Reich’s top scientists and engineers to an island fort just a few miles from downtown Boston — to find out what they knew and what they could do for America in the Cold War.

David Boeri
WBUR
09 min 51 sec
Air Date: 08/19/2010

At 17, Janesse Nieves tries to get her father to kick his heroin habit.

Janesse Nieves
Radio Rookies
08 min 39 sec
Air Date: 08/26/2002

An elegant dress belonging to Elna Baker’s grandmother becomes an oddly powerful talisman for her struggles with weight, her Mormon faith and trying out new identities.

Elna Baker
Studio 360
09 min 56 sec
Air Date: 10/16/2009

In a five-part series, Scott Carrier profiles the people of Ciudad Juarez — a city on the border with few rules, rampant poverty and a police force that can’t be trusted.

Scott Carrier
Day To Day
08 min 38 sec
Air Date: 06/19/2004

When Daniel Sosa turned 18, his father kicked him out of the house for being gay. Daniel describes the night he was forced to leave and his desire to return home.

Amy Drozdowska-McGuire
Hillary Frank
09 min 51 sec
Air Date: 2004

Video game designer Ian Bogost hates games like Farmville. So he created a parody, Cow Clicker. But rather than be taken as a joke, the game took on a life of its own.

PJ Vogt
On The Media
08 min 48 sec
Air Date: 11/18/2011

David Sedaris reflects on being an American in France during the war with Iraq.

David Sedaris
Morning Edition
03 min 16 sec
Air Date: 03/24/2003

For the celebrity chef, the song “96 Tears” was a gateway drug to sex, drugs and rock n’ roll, not to mention a narcotic-fueled roadtrip and a dead stripper.

Ann Heppermann
Rick Moody
Weekend America
07 min 09 sec
Air Date: 06/09/2007

From 1977, a home recording of 5-year-old Sofia Coppola, interviewed by her father, Oscar winner Francis Ford Coppola.

The Kitchen Sisters
Lost & Found Sound
04 min 53 sec
Air Date: 02/27/2004

Wow. Once left out of a 1965 concert recording, this version of Ray Charles’ “Georgia on My Mind” is slowed to a breathtaking crawl.

Marc Hirsh
NPR Music
07 min 26 sec
Air Date: 09/02/2011

A perfect “sonic ID” for the station that serves the Cape & Islands. From WCAI’s collection of pioneering, regional station identifications.

Jay Allison
WCAI
01 min 05 sec
Air Date: 2003

The reporter takes a trip to Somerville, Massachusetts, on a January day and finds neighbors shoveling their problems back and forth. “Everybody’s got to pahk somewhere and, on the calendar, spring is two months away.”

David Boeri
WBUR
04 min 35 sec
Air Date: 01/28/2011

We consume paper by the ton, but most of us never think about where it comes from or how it’s made. The reporter tries to make his own, using a recipe he found in poetry.

Sean Cole
Studio 360
08 min 05 sec
Air Date: 01/19/2007

The fight happened a long time ago when they were still in school. But for both Tom and Eric Hoebbel, the fight was a defining event — the kind of family story that gets trotted out for new acquaintances because it seems to convey something important.

Alix Spiegel
Morning Edition
08 min 48 sec
Air Date: 11/22/2010

The Major League Baseball hearing on Capitol Hill took a brief and peculiar detour from steroids to a discussion of linguistics. It focused on the phrase “it is what it is” and whether it means the same thing as “that’s the truth.”

Mike Pesca
Morning Edition
03 min 57 sec
Air Date: 02/14/2008

“I mean, you’re a teacher, Taylor.
Be honest. What do you make?

You want to know what I make?”

Taylor Mali
Rattle
02 min 50 sec
Air Date: 04/13/2009

What it’s like to be a 6’7″ tall American in Peshawar, Pakistan, in 2001 — at a pro-Taliban “Death to America” rally where Osama bin Laden is considered a hero.

John Burnett
Morning Edition
04 min 24 sec
Air Date: 10/22/2001

Charles Gaulperin is a Santeria priest and the owner of Botanica El Congo Manuel, a religious shop in a strip mall in Hollywood. The reporter goes to witness a sacred ceremony that involves the sacrifice of a hen and a sick man in New York.

Queena Sook Kim
Pacific Drift
05 min 00 sec
Air Date: 01/15/2006

Pasquale Spensieri spends his days driving around Brooklyn looking for dull blades. At the age of 70, he’s one of the last traveling grinders in New York City.

Joe Richman
Radio Diaries
05 min 47 sec
Air Date: 02/27/2002

Sean Lennon interviews his mother, Yoko Ono.

Katie Simon
StoryCorps
03 min 32 sec
Air Date: 11/26/2010

When the Marines of the 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment deployed to Afghanistan, they left behind families who were desperate for information and grew frightened as the death toll grew. For 25 families, the news they received was the worst possible.

Tom Bowman
All Things Considered
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 11/01/2011

In the 1930s, Ina Ray Hutton was strutting her stuff as a sexy blonde jazz singer. Decades later, a news reporter looked at one of her albums and felt something was odd: the blonde bombshell, she thought, might have been black.

Phyllis Fletcher
Studio 360
09 min 14 sec
Air Date: 09/30/2011

The right has been enshrined in the Constitution: Anyone accused of a crime has the right to a lawyer. Public defenders are supposed to represent the people who can’t afford lawyers. But they’ve been so overworked and underpaid, the system is in crisis.

Ailsa Chang
WNYC
09 min 00 sec
Air Date: 08/17/2009

There aren’t a lot of people like @maryagneskelley on Twitter. In the past few weeks, she has sent out tweets ranging from: “I love you!!!! Where am I?” to “Hallucinating~*.” Mary lives in a nursing facility and has Alzheimer’s disease.

Bob Oakes
Lisa Tobin
WBUR
7 min 10 sec
Air Date: 10/21/2011

In an odd pairing of reporter and subject matter, NPR’s sports guy went to New York City’s most in-demand shoe sale, and learns it’s not too far off his beat.

Mike Pesca
Day To Day
02 min 11 sec
Air Date: 11/08/2005

In July 2011, the folks from Longshot Magazine, a 48-hour magazine project, tried the same thing with radio. In one of the stories from the resulting podcast, Carl Collins talks about a life of debt and how it hasn’t stopped him, except for one time.

Alex Goldmark
Emma Jacobs
Longshot Radio
02 min 55 sec
Air Date: 07/31/2011

A detailed account of the planning for the operation and a play-by-play of the night the al-Qaida leader was killed, based on the recollections of the Navy SEALs.

Steve Inskeep
Morning Edition
07 min 22 sec
Air Date: 08/01/2011

NASA is figuring out how to take the next great leap into space. The difficulty is, if we send astronauts to Mars, they might not make it back.

Roman Mars
99% Invisible
09 min 09 sec
Air Date: 07/01/2010

Lisa Bufano is a dancer. She is also a double amputee. Her legs and fingers were amputated when she was 21, after a staph bacteria infection raged through her body.

Andrea Shea
WBUR
07 min 37 sec
Air Date: 03/19/2007

The iconic villain Darth Vader has it all: heavy breathing, theme music, brute power, and that impenetrable mask. In Vader’s case, the mask shields his humanity.

Andrea Shea
WBUR
07 min 18 sec
Air Date: 02/18/2008

Some of science’s great ideas were created in homespun ways. To test his ideas on evolution, Charles Darwin and his butler dropped asparagus into a tub. Darwin’s oldest son studied dead pigeons by letting them float upside down in a bowl.

Robert Krulwich
Morning Edition
08 min 51 sec
Air Date: 09/20/2006

For reasons that remain mostly mysterious, the note we call “B flat” does the oddest things. It aggravates alligators, it lurks in the stairwell of an office building, and it emanates from a supermassive black hole 250 million light years from Earth.

Robert Krulwich
Morning Edition
05 min 17 sec
Air Date: 02/16/2007

A restaurant in Switzerland offers up a different dining experience: Guests eat in complete darkness and are served by blind or visually handicapped waitstaff.

Adam Burke
Morning Edition
06 min 32 sec
Air Date: 03/10/2005

What would it take to design a yawn so powerful that it would make everyone who saw it yawn back? And a dog can make a person yawn, but the other way around?

Robert Krulwich
All Things Considered
07 min 25 sec
Air Date: 09/24/2007

TV shows have been bleeping profanity for years when people speak extemporaneously. In recent years, however, scripted shows have been writing profanity in — and then bleeping it out for comedic effect.

Neda Ulaby
All Things Considered
04 min 32 sec
Air Date: 10/25/2007

Dr. Oliver Sacks called her “Mrs. O’C.” She was Irish. She was old. And she had a problem: One night, while sleeping in her room at a Catholic old people’s home in the Bronx, she was awakened by a voice, a female voice singing Irish ballads.

Robert Krulwich
Weekend Edition
08 min 22 sec
Air Date: 12/15/2007

A deeply sensuous character who speaks to our most basic appetites. He’s always been blue, always been furry, always been voracious. But he didn’t always eat cookies.

Elizabeth Blair
All Things Considered
07 min 09 sec
Air Date: 02/08/2008

A 1965 Syd Barrett song recorded as a demo with Pink Floyd before they had formed.

Ken Freedman
WFMU
02 min 53 sec
Air Date: 07/14/2006

When country music legend Willie Nelson was a child, he heard a heavenly tune coming through his front door that’s been under his skin ever since.

Michael May
Studio 360
06 min 31 sec
Air Date: 12/28/2007

Roger Ebert is famous for arguing on TV with Gene Siskel. Now that cancer surgeries have left him without the ability to speak, Ebert has found a new voice online.

Melissa Block
All Things Considered
08 min 57 sec
Air Date: 09/13/2011

Nine-year-old Isabelle has Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder that makes her pathologically trusting. She has no social fear. But as Isabelle gets older, the negative side of her trusting nature has begun to play a larger role.

Alix Spiegel
Morning Edition
08 min 33 sec
Air Date: 04/26/2010

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, two fighter pilots were on alert at Otis National Guard Base on Cape Cod. When word of a possible hijacking came, Lt. Col. Dan Nash and Col. Tim Duffy flew at supersonic speed to New York City.

Lisa Tobin
Michael May
WBUR
08 min 34 sec
Air Date: 09/07/2011

Mark used to hear straight guys in his inner-city neighborhood whisper about his style on the bus. Now, they’re copying his look, trading in their blue jeans, white shirts and Nikes for, “big shiny sunglasses, sparkling necklaces, tight-legged jeans and a cute shirt” — a style once considered gay in his neighborhood.

Mark Anthony Waters
Day To Day
03 min 45 sec
Air Date: 09/25/2008

Betty Ong was a flight attendant on board Flight 11, the first of the two planes to hit the World Trade Center. That morning, Betty’s brother, Harry, was up at 6 a.m. and watching TV. He immediately called his sister, Cathie. The two remember that day and their battle to present the public with the truth about Betty.

Lisa Tobin
Michael May
WBUR
07 min 30 sec
Air Date: 09/06/2011

For several decades, psychiatrists who work with the dying have been trying to come up with new psychotherapies that can help people cope with the reality of their death. One of these therapies asks the dying to tell the story of their life.

Alix Spiegel
Morning Edition
08 min 32 sec
Air Date: 09/12/2011

Amanda is gay, her family is Catholic, and they’re having a hard time accepting her.

Joe Richman
Radio Diaries
09 min 43 sec
Air Date: 1996